Wouldn’t directing pedestrians and bicycles to other destinations such as the path on Baxter Boulevard be more appropriate than making Forest Avenue friendlier to these modes of travel?
While destinations such as Back Cove Trail might be more suited for recreational walking and biking, people who walk or bike as their primary mode of transportation need to safely access the same shops, institutions, and other destinations that people in cars do. They should be safely accommodated for.

Residents living near Forest Avenue should not feel obligated to drive a car for short trips simply because walking or biking feels unsafe or uninviting. Also, no matter what mode of transport you use, all customers (except for drive-through customers) become pedestrians once they have parked their cars. Making Forest Avenue hospitable for all modes of travel is therefore important for community safety and for economic development, which is well served by a more active street life.

Show All Answers

1. Would improving the transit, pedestrian, and bicycling conditions on Forest Avenue result in automobile delay and diversion into adjacent neighborhoods?
2. Wouldn’t directing pedestrians and bicycles to other destinations such as the path on Baxter Boulevard be more appropriate than making Forest Avenue friendlier to these modes of travel?
3. Is this study revisiting the proposal to increase residential density in the R-3 and R-5 zones adjacent to Forest Avenue?
4. How does this study interface with the work that Maine Department of Transportation is doing to improve the I-295 Exit 6 interchange?